Quite Frankly the Band

Reese Woods

Nichole Thomas, Editor in Chief

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Rain and wind did not stop the electric performance of Quite Frankly the band on August 24. With nearly 20 South students in attendance, the crowd was in for an entertaining night. All band members are under the age of 18; everyone was in for a surprise.

On bass guitar was sophomore Scout Matthews and the singer was freshman Carolyn Armstrong. The rest of the band consisted of Nate Gregory on guitar, Jolson Robert on vocals and alto saxophone, and Cael Duff as a substitute drummer. The band covered many classic songs such as, “Carry on my Wayward Son” by Kansas, “Jolene” by Dolly Parton, and “Sweet Home Alabama” by Lynyrd Skynyrd.

A big hit for the night was one of their originals titled “Roommate” sung by Armstrong. Hitting difficult notes with ease, the song fit the personality of the band perfectly. When Armstrong wasn’t singing lead vocals, she’d grab a tambourine or dance around the stage.

As for Matthews, she played bass like a natural. Standing to the left of Carolyn, they would go back and forth with each other many times throughout the show interacting with such excitement. A tradition for the band is the playing of the national anthem at each of their concerts. They do this in honor of Matthew’s brother who is currently deployed for the Marines.

The biggest excitement of the night was when Robert brought out his alto sax. His upbeat improvised solos drew everyone’s attention. Kids grabbed immediately for their phones, getting a video on snapchat as quickly as possible. A couple sitting in the back stood after his first solo with looks of amazement. Undoubtedly Robert had a well practiced talent. Throughout the night he took a few turns playing drums as well.

Another big hit for the crowd was the solos played by 14-year-old Gregory, the youngest member of the band. With his neon green jeans he was already enough to draw attention from the crowd, but playing the guitar behind his head was sure to guarantee the eyes of everyone in attendance. He played many challenging guitar solos and nailed every one.

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